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Can we save The Lost Continent?

Between Bremerton and Silverdale there remains an area in Kitsap County so pristine and wild that it has been called “The Lost Continent.” Major portions of this unique natural area were acquired for the Illahee Preserve Kitsap Heritage Park between 2001 and 2007, but several key properties were unavailable.  We now have a very short opportunity to save this land for current and future generations!

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Ways you can help:

1.  You can easily donate online.

2.  You can mail a check to:

Illahee Forest Preserve, c/o Jonathan Buesch, Treasurer

6253 East Boulevard NE, Bremerton, WA 98311

3. Tell your friends, neighbors, and co-workers about this important project!

4. Volunteer to help out in any capacity:  email info@IllaheePreserve.org

Donate Now!

Despite a lot of reasonable skepticism, the Illahee Forest Preserve non-profit successfully raised more than $769,000 in 7 months to begin the Phase I purchase of the most sensitive 25.5 acres of the Timbers Edge property.

Now for Phase II we are attempting to protect as much of the forest on the remaining 10.7 acres as possible.  The owner is pledging an additional $150,000 because we reached the first phase.  We have to raise a cumulative total of $1,718,000 by September 4, 2015 to purchase the entire 36.2 acres.

The Lost Continent Project is a campaign by the Illahee Forest Preserve, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit.  All donations are tax deductible.

 

Singular Opportunity.

We have a unique opportunity to save and preserve some of the most sensitive natural features in one of the most populated areas in the county. The target of the campaign is the 36 acre Timbers Edge (TE) development adjacent to the Illahee Preserve and Illahee Creek.

 

Brief Timbers Edge History.

The planned development, consisting of mostly small lots (40’ by 90’), was fought by the community (opposed by more than 700 residents), but approved by the Hearing Examiner. A bankruptcy ensued several years later, with the new owner planning to either sell or develop the property.

 

The Property.

The 36 acre property consists mainly of forested plateau and sloped riparian areas that abut Illahee Creek. On the east end of the property is the site of the four acre Avery Homestead. The map (click to enlarge) shows how critical the property is to the Illahee Preserve, the watershed, wildlife corridors, and proposed trails between the Preserve, Puget Sound, and Illahee State Park.

 

Discounted Purchase

An agreement was eventually reached by all parties whereby the IFP could purchase either 25 acres of the most sensitive areas abutting Illahee Creek for $767K, or the entire 36 acres for $1.7M. In both cases the owner would provide a substantial contribution towards the purchase, making these more attainable.

Timbers Edge Phases Map

 

Benefits

The acquisition directly supports the Preserve’s mission statement which includes: “To establish and develop a premiere nature preserve and park … [and] To preserve to the greatest extent possible the natural character of Illahee forest lands and the Illahee Creek watershed…”

The acquisition will secure key forest and watershed properties necessary to maintain the continuity of riparian properties along Illahee Creek. The acquisition reduces or eliminates the blockage of wildlife corridors and a dense development bordering these sensitive areas. It will provide connectivity to the south with other Preserve properties and to the east with two other targeted Illahee Creek riparian properties. Both directions are potential routes for a regional trail system to improve community enjoyment of these natural areas.

The acquisition would also protect a critical aquifer recharge area. Hydrologic and USGS studies of the area have shown water infiltration in the Illahee watershed is necessary to support ground water extraction for human use and also to ensure base flows to support salmonids in Illahee Creek.

 

Double Your Contribution!

This acquisition would be an enormous benefit to the future of the Preserve as it would serve as a match for other grants, such as the required 50% match needed to apply for RCO grants. In other words, the funds raised to purchase this property can potentially be doubled through a state matching grant to purchase the remaining properties targeted to complete the Preserve!

 

Why Contribute?

  • It helps complete the Preserve by connecting critical targeted forest and riparian habitats.
  • It helps maintain the groundwater recharge of the critical Manette aquifer (already impacted).
  • It lessens further storm water impacts to Illahee Creek, the Illahee Road culvert, and Puget Sound.
  • It insures base flows in Illahee Creek affecting salmon species are not further degraded.
  • It is a recommendation of the 2008 DOE/Port funded Watershed Management Plan (#Pur-1).
  • It avoids a pressurized sewer main running through Illahee with major cost impacts to residents (either the 25 or 36 acre purchase avoids this).
  • It eliminates or reduces the small lots and a major traffic concern for residents who live along Fir Drive.

 

What If Funding Is Not Raised?

By purchasing the first 25.5 acres, the approved 87 lot development is reduced to a 43 lot development with reduced impact on the community.  A purchase of the full 36.2 acres could eliminate all development.  The Illahee Community Club and the IFP boards have agreed to support the development if the funds are not raised for this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.

 

Donor Wall.

A donor recognition wall is being planned at the Illahee Preserve’s Almira entrance for gifts of $1,000 or more.

PLEASE DONATE TODAY! Your support of this time sensitive campaign is critical!!!

Donate Now!TE-phase2-thumb

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Fundraising Progress

$1,718,000
$769,000
$939,000

Click in the map to explore.

Notice the green patch surrounded by development. We’re working to save this for future generations, and we need your help.